Workshops

IWC Workshops are intensive 4-hour courses that require a separate registration. Workshops are based on minimum reservations. Each 4-hour workshop is $250 each for registered conference attendees. If you register for 2 workshops, you will receive a $100 Discount.


Sunday, November 15, 2015 - 1-5PM

W1: Water Treatment 101 (repeated on Wednesday)

This workshop is a great introductory course covering the basic concepts of water treatment for industry. It will address unit operations (clarification, filtration, lime/soda ash softening, iron and manganese removal, membrane filters, and roughing demineralizers) used in water preparation for industry with emphasis on power, chemical industry, and refineries. It was include treatment of makeup water for cooling water systems as well as boiler water makeup. Wastewater generated by these unit operations and their treatment and disposal will be discussed. Basic water chemistry requirements for low, medium, and high pressure boilers will be considered with chemical conditioning as required.

Instructor: Dennis McBride, Fluor Enterprise Greenville, SC


W2: Ion Exchange Technology and Practical Operating Practices (repeated on Thursday)

This workshop provides a detailed review of the various ion exchange processes for softening and demineralizing water as well as preparation for boilers, cooling, and process applications. A section on how to evaluate systems, their resin, operation, and water quality of ion exchange units is an excellent troubleshooting and informative portion of this workshop. A review of the different ion exchange resins available along with the newest developments and how those can be applied to provide specific water quality is a must for water treatment system operations. This is a great opportunity to ask questions and solve problems.

Instructor: Wayne Bernahl, W. Bernahl Enterprises, Elmhurst, IL


Wednesday, November 18, 2015 - 1-5PM


W1A: Water Treatment 101 (repeated from Sunday)

This workshop is a great introductory course covering the basic concepts of water treatment for industry. It will address unit operations (clarification, filtration, lime/soda ash softening, iron and manganese removal, membrane filters, and roughing demineralizers) used in water preparation for industry with emphasis on power, chemical industry, and refineries. It was include treatment of makeup water for cooling water systems as well as boiler water makeup. Wastewater generated by these unit operations and their treatment and disposal will be discussed. Basic water chemistry requirements for low, medium, and high pressure boilers will be considered with chemical conditioning as required.

Instructor: Dennis McBride, Fluor Enterprise, Greenville, SC


W3: Industrial Boiler Water (up to 1800 PSIG/120 Bar)

The course is intended for those interested in industrial steam systems operating at pressures up to 1800 psig. While some basic theory is covered, the main focus of the course is to provide practical information that can be used to avoid common system problems. The course covers deaerators, boilers, steam turbines and condensate systems from both mechanical operation and chemical treatment aspects. The causes of deposition and corrosion as well as water quality and monitoring guidelines and chemical treatment options are discussed in an informal atmosphere.

Instructor: James Robinson, GE Betz Trevose, PA


W4: Introduction to Cooling Tower Water Systems and How to Develop a Cooling Tower Water Treatment Program 101

This workshop discusses the problems commonly found in Cooling Tower Water systems and the various water treatments that can be used to control or prevent those problems. Specific water treatment chemicals are discussed and their advantages and disadvantages are presented. These specific chemicals are for corrosion, scale, fouling, and microbiological control. They are identified generically and include the most recent developments. The preparation of the complete water treatment program is provided in easy to apply steps. This workshop is excellent for operators, utility mangers, and water treatment suppliers both new on the job and great as a refresher for others.

Instructor: Paul Puckorius, Puckorious & Associates, Inc., Arvada, CO


W5: Thermal Zero Liquid Discharge Processes

This course is designed to give a basic understanding of the information required for the selection and design of an evaporation system in a wastewater application. It will include the impacts of chemistry, equipment selection and energy source selection as well as provide case studies based on real world applications in a variety

Insructor: J. Michael Marlett, Aqua-Chem ICD, Hartland, WI


W6: Treating Produced Water with Ion Exchange Technologies

General introduction on Softening with Ion Exchange. Description of the nature of SAC resin and of WAC resin. Influence of TDS on selection of which resin to select. Advantages to consider SAC-SAC systems. Why single WAC are able to produce soft water (less than 0.1ppm) on water with up to 25000ppm TDS. Why WAC Primary followed by WAC Polisher should be considered. Potential foulants of ion exchange resins in the process of softening Produced Water, and how to deal with them. All data presented is based on actual plant experience!

Instructor: Guy Mommaerts, Ion Exchange Services Canada, Inc, Elimira, ON Canada


W7: Arsenic and Selenium in Wastewater Treatment

Changes in regulations in the coal-fired power industry and existing standards in the mining industry are but two examples of increased regulatory focus on arsenic and selenium. These ions have not been the focus of emphasis for widespread industrial treatment in the past. Numerous new technologies have been promoted for use in the treatment of arsenic and selenium. However, it is difficult for the environmental personnel responsible for making intelligent decisions in this area to assess the real potential of treatment technologies to cost-effectively achieve the desired goals. This course will provide the background necessary for those concerned with arsenic, selenium or both to make sound decisions about the technical direction of treatment options.

Instructor: John Schubert, P.E., HDR Engineering, Sarasota, FL


W8: Produced Water - Treatment Chemicals Step-by-Step in SAGD and CSS Processes

This course is intended for SAGD and CSS chemical technologists, engineers, plant operators and supervisors interested in better understanding the effects of various chemicals on produced water throughout the entire processes in plant facilities. Some basic theory is covered but the primary goal of the course is to provide practical information that can be applied to prevent common system problems. The program material includes inlet separation, de-oiling, evaporators, warm or hot lime softening, filtration and ion exchange. The setting is interactive with past or present plant experiences being shared for the benefit of the course.

Instructor: Rene Belanger, Baker Hughes, Calgary, Alberta Canada


W9: Wet Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) Chemistry and Operational Impacts on Wastewater Quality Discharge

This workshop will provide an overview of wet FGD chemistry and operating factors that will affect the wastewater quality. The various subsystems of the wet FGD system will be discussed including reagent handling, reagent preparation, absorber internals, recycle slurry, slurry spray headers, mist eliminators, primary dewatering, secondary dewatering, and wastewater treatment. The workshop will discuss the operational chemistry involved in removal of SO2 from the flue gas and highlight how operating parameters like pH, conductivity, ORP, and other issues affect the overall process. The workshop will also address how operation of the wet FGD system can affect the quality of the wastewater being discharged.

Instructor: Bryan D. Hansen, PE, Burns & McDonnell, Centennial, CO


W10: Environmental Compliance Regulations in the Power Industry

Never has there been a time in the history of electric generation that so many regulations are going into effect or planned to go into effect at the same time in multimedia fields. This workshop will examine in detail all of these rules and their impact on environmental compliance and their impact on electric generation.

Rules that will be reviewed, MATS, Effluent Guidelines, CASPR, 316B, CCR, 111D and new source review. The workshop will also look at the impact of NSR settlements. We will also look at what is going on in SPCC, Land and Avian Protection. The workshop will not only focus on the rules but the impact on the future of electricity and fuel sources.

Instructor: Bert Valenkamph, Northern Indiana Public Service Company (NIPSCO), Merrillville, Indiana


Thursday, November 19, 2015 - 8AM-Noon


W11: Treatment of Water for Steam Generation in SAGD Enhanced Oil Recovery Plants

"Once you know the fundamentals, acquiring experience is just a matter of time." This course explores the theories and fundamental practices for treating de-oiled produced and brackish waters to generate high pressure steam for use in SAGD enhanced oil recovery operations. We will explore hot and warm lime softening, filtration and ion exchange options such as strong acid versus weak acid cation softening including in-situ versus external regeneration.

Instructor: Robert Holloway, Holloway Associates, Etobicoke, ON Canada


W12: HRSG and High Pressure (>900 PSIG/60 BAR) Boiler Water Treatment and Operation

This workshop will cover the water quality required for high pressure (>900 psig/60 bar) steam boilers including the various treatments being used and new developments relative to protection from scale and corrosion. The course will also cover treatment issues related to pre-boiler systems and the condensate systems and a discussion of controls and troubleshooting techniques. Operators, utility plant supervisors, managers, and engineers can all benefit greatly from the practical information provided in this course.

Instructor: David Daniels, Mechanical & Materials Engineering, Austin, TX


W13: Water Treatment 201

This course reviews the topics covered in Water Treatment 101 and build on those to provide design and technical details on designing water treatment systems using supplier's equipment information. Unit processes covered in this course are pretreatment softening using lime and soda ash, sodium cycle ion exchange for softening, demineralization of pretreated raw water using cation/ anion/ mixed-bed ion exchange systems, reverse osmosis, and EDI. Boiler water chemistry guidelines and chemicals feeds for boiler chemistry control for high pressure power plant boilers, combined cycle plants, and industrial boilers (up to 1500 psi) will be discussed. Advanced wastewater treatment concepts for power plants, industrial plants, and refineries will be included with recycle and reuse when feasible.

Instructor: Kumar Sinha, Private Consultant, Frederick, MD


W14: Advanced Ion Exchange

This workshop is designed to build on basic ion exchange principals and will provide the opportunity to acquire an in depth knowledge of how ion exchange resins can be used in applications other than traditional softening and deionizing applications. The workshop is divided into four sections.

1. Ion exchange fundamental theories and a review of the four basic types of ion exchangers, how their properties differ, and how they are used.

2. Capacity calculations for any virtually any ion and solution and how to make preliminary calculations to determine if ion exchange is feasible and/or practical.

3. Trace ion removal, principal of concentration difference, an over view of selective resins, and brief discussion of how some of the more common trace contaminants can be treated.

4. Identification of problems causes, troubleshooting approaches, cleaning strategies, and how to set up spreadsheet models of operating ion exchange systems that normalize operating data.

In order to get the most out of this workshop, students will need to bring laptops that have MS Office software including Excel.

Instructor: Peter Meyers, Resin Tech, Inc, West Berlin, NJ


W15: Reverse Osmosis - Back to the Basics, Design and Operation

The application of reverse osmosis (RO) has grown rapidly over the last 15 year. However, some of the basics have been lost in shuffle. Furthermore, many times professionals and operators familiar with ion exchange are now faced with operating RO systems with little or no training. This Workshop covers the basics of RO, from sound design to proper operating techniques. Fouling and concentration polarization, data collection and normalization, cleaning and storage are just some of the topics included in this Workshop. This Workshop is intended for all who need to understand the basics of RO.

Instructor: Jane Kucera, Nalco Company, an Ecolab Company, Naperville, IL


W16: Fundamentals of Evaporative Water Treatment for Steam Generating EOR Processes

Evaporative water treatment may seem complex at surface level, but once the underlying principles are understood, evaporation system design and operation become very straightforward. This course is designed to explore everything from the fundamentals of evaporator technology to its integration into various EOR processes: steam injection processes such as SAGD and CSS. Course matter will cover the basics of producing water suitable for steam generation (either drum boilers or OTSG's) and maximizing water recycle by employing concentration and crystallization systems. A particular emphasis will be placed on water chemistry design implications and unit operations such as falling film evaporation and crystallization will be covered in-depth. Several real world case studies will be examined to reinforce theoretical principles.

Instructor: Greg Mandigo, Aquatech International Corp., Hartland, WI


W17: Solutions for Power Plant ELGs: Understanding your Plant and Creating a Roadmap to Compliance

Wastewater discharges from power plants across the U.S. continue to fall under tighter and tighter scrutiny by federal, state, and local regulatory agencies. National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permits today often specify very low numerical limits for discharge of heavy metals and other constituents that were unheard of when the plants were originally designed and constructed. The proposed amendment to the Steam Electric Power Effluent Limitation Guidelines (ELGs) is poised to add additional technology-based limitations on discharge of certain contaminants such as mercury, arsenic, and selenium to various power plant wastewater streams, such as wet FGD purge, that were previously regulated as low volume wastewaters and subject to minimal federally mandated limitations.

This workshop will provide participants with an understanding of the new power plant ELGs and details on the various options available to comply with the requirements of the rule. The instructors will present participants with a roadmap to guide them in analyzing the wastewater sources within their own power plant as well as provide them with resources to evaluate the economic and regulatory impacts relative to the timing for implementation. Throughout the course of the workshop, the participants will walk through this process of investigating and evaluating options and developing a practical plan for compliance with the new power plant ELG rule using a theoretical representative coal fired power plant.

Instructor: Colleen Layman, HDR, Ann Arbor, MI; James Beninati, P.E, HDR, Pittsburgh, PA; Michael J. Soller, Bowen Engineering, Indianapolis, IN


W18: Produced Water OTSG Scaling and Corrosion

Thermal oil recovery operations require large quantities of high pressure steam. Produced water, water separated from the emulsion produced by the oil wells, is the most readily available and efficient source of boiler feedwater. Unfortunately, produced water contains many impurities that can cause a variety of scale and corrosion problems in the system. This workshop will focus on the major scale and corrosion challenges posed by operating once through steam generators (OTSGs) on produced water. Produced water chemistry and major unit operations for pretreatment will be reviewed. Mineral scale formation and coke formation on OTSG heat transfer surfaces will be examined in detail including methods for diagnosing, monitoring and mitigating these deposition problems. Major corrosion mechanisms such as oxygen corrosion, erosion corrosion and steam system corrosion will also be discussed as will the special challenges for monitoring and preventing those damaging reactions. Participants will be encouraged to consider OTSG scale and corrosion problems in the broader context of total plant operation and the impacts of water recycle and system design in the SAGD process will be discussed.

Instructor: Martin Godfrey, Nalco, An Ecolab Company, Eagan MN


W19: Electrodeionization (EDI)

Electrodeionization (EDI) is a hybrid of two well-known processes, ion-exchange deionization (IX) and electrodialysis (ED). It was developed to allow the production of deionized water without the use of the hazardous acid and caustic that are required to regenerate ion exchange resins. EDI is now over 25 years old and is used extensively in many industries, especially in the production of deionized water for pharmaceutical formulations, power generation and manufacture of microelectronics/semiconductor devices. It is usually employed as a polishing demineralization step with reverse osmosis (RO) upstream as the roughing demineralizer. This workshop will start by reviewing the principles of the EDI process, how it differs from IX, how EDI modules are constructed, and EDI feed water requirements. It will then focus on practical aspects of EDI system design, operation, maintenance and troubleshooting.

Instructor: Jonathan Wood, Evoqua Water Technologies, Lowell, MA


W20: Cooling Water Treatment Programs and Guidelines When Switching from Fresh to Reuse Water Makeup

This workshop will cover guidelines to be used in developing a cooling water treatment technology going from fresh to recycle waters as makeup. These guidelines will identify possible concerns and potential benefits with recycle water. A step by step approach is provided not only for existing cooling tower water systems but also new systems that can handle almost any recycled waters. A number of case histories are provided. Attendees are encouraged to bring not only any questions but also details on their cooling tower water systems and the recycle water quality being considered. A must workshop for operators, utility managers, and for water treatment suppliers.

Instructor: Paul Puckorius, Puckorious & Associates, Inc, Arvada, CO


Thursday, November 19, 2015 - 1-5PM


W2A: Ion Exchange Technology and Practical Operating Practices (repeated from Sunday)

This workshop provides a detailed review of the various ion exchange processes for softening and demineralizing water as well as preparation for boilers, cooling, and process applications. A section on how to evaluate systems, their resin, operation, and water quality of ion exchange units is an excellent troubleshooting and informative portion of this workshop. A review of the different ion exchange resins available along with the newest developments and how those can be applied to provide specific water quality is a must for water treatment system operations. This is a great opportunity to ask questions and solve problems.

Instructor: Wayne Bernahl, W. Bernahl Enterprises, Elmhurst, IL


W21: Proper Design for Ion Exchange Softeners in SAGD or Cyclic Steam Operations

Ion exchange in SAGD waters, both brackish and produced, is usually limited to softening for OTSG makeup. Both are usually lime softened, and often contain high TDS levels, low hardness to TDS ratios and foulants such as oil. This course will explain the two different processes, WAC or SAC ion exchange, reasons for picking one.

Instructor: Donald Downey, The Purolite Company, Paris, ON Canada


W22: De-oiling Produced Water for In Situ Oil Sands

Upstream of "Produced Water Treatment" in SAGD or CSS, water that has been separated from the bulk bitumen/dilbit phase, contains varying amounts of hydrocarbon. If not removed from the system this hydrocarbon will negatively impact the performance of Boiler Feed Water pre-treatment equipment such as Lime Softening, Ion Exchange and Evaporators. This introductory course looks at the fundamentals of the De-oiling system. We will explore the purpose and system design, of specific equipment such as Skim Tanks, Induced floatation (ISF and IGF), as well as Oil Removal Filters (ORF's). We will also discuss industry standards, chemistry, and lessons learned.

Instructor: Chris Graham, C.G.Consulting, Inc., Calgary, AB Canada


W23: Water and Wastewater Treatment for Natural Gas Development

The ongoing development of the unconventional natural gas market was made possible by developments in the fields of directional drilling and hydrofracturing.

Hydrofracturing requires large volumes of water, processing of that water to use in hydrofracturing, and handling of the return water from the well after Completion of hydrofracturing. As hydrofracturing water comes in contact with shale, some of the soluble shale constituents dissolve into the hydrofracturing water.

Current options for handling of hydrofracturing water include treatment for reuse, treatment for discharge, and deep well disposal. The focus of this course is to provide a foundational understanding of the use of water in hydrofracturing, and the disposition of return water (flowback and produced water) from hydrofractured wells. Areas of emphasis include hydrofracturing water preparation, treatment of flowback water for reuse, evaporation-crystallization of hydrofracturing water.

Instructor: John Schubert, P.E., HDR Engineering, Sarasota, FL


W24: UF, RO and EDI Maintenance and Cleaning

Presentation of common practices in the maintenance of ultrafiltration, reverse osmosis and deionization systems, including best practices for off-line clean-in-place process as well as on-site membrane cleaning practices membrane and system life and minimizing operations cost. For ultra-filtration and reverse osmosis the training review will cover preventive maintenance practices, spares replacement frequencies, and non-scheduled maintenance repairs. There will be a detailed discussion of membrane maintenance practices, including why cleaning is important, when CIP or onsite site cleaning should be triggered, the common foulants, preparation of cleaning solutions, standard cleaning procedures, tips and shortcuts, and when off-site membrane cleaning should be considered.

Attention will be focused on the key performance indicators for RO/NF membranes and hollow fiber ultrafiltration membranes that should trigger a membrane cleaning process and the variation in procedures and solutions for onsite cleaning for RO/NF membranes for removal of silt, biological materials, naturally occurring organics, calcium carbonate, iron and silica as well as UF membranes for removal of biological materials, silt, naturally occurring organics, and iron.

There will also be discussion of membrane autopsies, when they are needed and how to interpret the results. With the increasing use of electrodeionization technology such as continuous deionization the instructor will also touch on best practices in determination when unit cleaning is required as well as proper chemical cleaning and off site cleaning practices.

Instructor: Robert Cohen, Evoqua Water Technologies, LLC, Rochester, NY


W25: Wastewater Treatment for Energy and Chemicals

Subjects discussed:

1. Identification of wastewater streams
2. Selective segregation of wastewater streams
3. Pretreatment of segregated streams
4. Terminology & Microbiology of wastewater treatment
5. Primary wastewater treatment unit operations
6. Secondary wastewater treatment unit operations
7. Solids production, its treatment and disposal management

Instructor: Rafique Janjua, Fluor, Sugarland, TX


W26: Mine Water Treatment

Mining activities have resulted in significant environmental impacts all over the world. Local communities, state, and federal authorities are enforcing stricter effluent discharge limitations on new and existing facilities. Mine water management, handling of acid mine drainage, and water reuse are some of the major challenges in the mining industry. Mining processes, mine water characteristics, current practices and emerging physical/ chemical and biological treatment technologies pertaining to mine water management and treatment will be the focus of this workshop.

Conventional and new physical/chemical technologies for removal of heavy metals, arsenic, selenium and other oxyanions will be reviewed. Cyanide chemistry and treatment technologies will be presented. Technologies to meet the latest stringent sulfate discharge limitations also will be discussed. The growing emphasis on mine water reuse and technologies to make reuse possible will be considered.

Interest is growing in biological treatment as an economically viable solution for removing various constituents from mine water. Mining effluents can contain nitrogen in a variety of forms. When explosives such as ANFO are used, ammonia and nitrate are present. In gold mining where cyanide extraction is used, CN, SCN, OCN and NH4-N are present. All of these can be removed biologically through nitrification/denitrification processes. Coal and copper mine effluent may be contaminated with selenium present as selenate or selenite. These contaminants can be reduced to elemental selenium, a particulate form of the mineral, which can then be separated from the water phase. Particular attention will be given to MBBR (moving bed biofilm reactor) technology, which has been used successfully in several mining applications.

All technologies discussed will include detailed information such as pilot study results as well as case studies and performance data for full-scale installations. Don't miss this opportunity to learn about the latest developments in water management and treatment for the mining industry.

Instructor: Kashi Banergee Ph.D., P.E, BCEE, Veolia, Moon Twp., PA; Caoline Dale, Veolia, Cary, NC


W27: Electrolyte Simulation, an Introduction to Electrolyte Chemistry

The purpose of this beginner course is to introduce the attendee to the key contributors that create the water properties we all know: pH, Alkalinity, vapor pressure, conductivity, concentration effects, density, and mineral scaling. The class will begin with describing the properties of pure water, hydrogen bonding and relating this property to waters boiling and freezing points. Next, the ability of water to polarize will be explained and with that the impact on solubility. Time will be reserved for Q&A with respect to how these properties impact field observations. This discussion will be aided by hands-on examples using electrolyte simulation software. The course is strictly science-based and is not intended to instruct in design or operations.

Instructor: AJ Gerbino, OLI, Denville, NJ



If you should have questions or an idea for a new Workshop, please contact us at 412-261-0710, ext 10.